Rotsa-Ton-Hawa

“Written in the Sky”

Some American Indians have more than one name. Frequently, a newborn remains nameless until the right situation presents itself or the father has the “Right Dream”, then the child is named based on the subject of the dream. Sometimes he receives a second name relating to a significant occurrence in his life or out of respect and admiration for a friend or relative. Often, another name is obtained during a traditional rite of passage when the boy reaches puberty which includes fasting and meditation to find a Guardian to guide him through life. Some people do numerous Vision Quests throughout their lifetime. “Written in the Sky” received this name as an adult during a special Vision Quest ceremony. As a warrior he is entitled to wear eagle feathers. The horizontal orientation of the feathers usually denotes coups achieved in battle and the red dot signifies a wound that was received. His silver ball and cone earrings were very popular trade items of the 17th and 18th centuries and were supplied by all of the major European nations. The buffalo (bison) robe around his shoulders could have been obtained through contact with the Plains Nations, however, the eastern tribes regularly hunted the woodland (eastern) buffalo which biologists widely recognize as a subspecies. They ranged from east of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the waters of the Mississippi River, but were eradicated by the 1820’s by the overwhelming numbers of Europeans that settled in the eastern half of North America. The lance was originally a spontoon or half-pike of the 1750-1770 period that was normally carried by commissioned officers of foot companies as a badge of rank. British, French and American officers all utilized them.

  
Available As A Limited Edition Canvas Print
Ten In The Issue

Size - 20" x 16"     Framed Price - $400.00     Unframed Price - $250.00